Community Cerro Azul

Cerro Azul
Tecate

Cerro Azul is a rural community nestled in the mountains of the high plain region about six miles South of the city of Tecate.. It has a population of roughly four thousand distributed in three colonies and some ranches. The village is known for its floor and roof tiles, as well as native pottery made from the clay soil of the region. Owing to its remote location, electricity and telephone are the only services available in the community. There is no running water, sewer or system for garbage collection. Water is expensive, available only from delivery trucks that fill plastic barrels which families have at home. There is an elementary school and a junior high school. The economic challenges are different for our two Tecate communities. This is rural poverty with the main economic activity being brick and tile manufacturing and pottery production, much of which is consumed in the state and exported to California. There are a few small businesses and some agricultural activity. Most of the factories that used to operate in the area are now abandoned.

Owing to its remote location, electricity and telephone are the only services available in the community. There is no running water, sewer or system for garbage collection. Water is expensive, available only from delivery trucks that fill plastic barrels which families have at home. There is an elementary school and a junior high school.

The economic challenges are different for our two Tecate communities. This is rural poverty with the main economic activity being brick and tile manufacturing and pottery production, much of which is consumed in the state and exported to California. There are a few small businesses and some agricultural activity. Most of the factories that used to operate in the area are now abandoned.

 

What are Cerro Azul’s people saying about their Community?

“Anywhere up to 10 people could be living in an average household. Our streets are unpaved and made of dirt. We have received a lot of help from Corazón, and the community is more organized now. I am thankful that everyone has an equal opportunity to work with Corazón.” – Ramona (78)

“The biggest problem I see in my community is the lack of a proper drainage system, and paved roads. But the progress I’ve seen before and after Corazón is immense. There were hardly any houses, now a number of people have their own homes.” –Miriam (32)

 

If your community were an animal what would it be?

“A spider, because of its many roads”— Antonia (64)